Donald Trump ordered to hand over tax returns to prosecutors

Donald Trump has been ordered by the US Supreme Court to hand over his tax returns and other financial records to prosecutors in New York. 

The former US president has been refusing to release the documents for several years, despite a precedent that presidential candidates should do so.

A lower court had earlier ruled that the records were pertinent to a criminal investigation.

The ruling does not necessarily mean the files will be made public.

The financial documents should be provided as evidence to a grand jury to be scrutinised in secret, and might only later become public as part of an indictment. 

A grand jury is set up by a prosecutor to determine whether there is enough evidence to pursue a prosecution. The jury is given investigative powers and can issue subpoenas to compel people to testify.

The US Supreme Court’s decision is a blow to Mr Trump, who has been in a legal battle to protect his records from a grand jury for months.

Last July, the Supreme Court ruled that Mr Trump’s financial records could be examined by prosecutors in New York.

But lawyers representing Mr Trump challenged that ruling, suggesting that the court filing was “wildly overbroad” and issued in bad faith.

On Monday, the court rejected the lawyers’ argument. 

According to US media, this was the last opportunity for the former president, who left the White House last month ahead of President Joe Biden’s inauguration, to keep the records private. 

Mr Trump has continuously denied wrongdoing and has called the investigation into his tax affairs a “witch hunt”.

In a statement on Monday, Mr Trump accused New York prosecutors of unfairly targeting him and said that the Supreme Court “never should have let this ‘fishing expedition’ happen”. 

What’s the background to this?

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a Democrat, has been trying for months to obtain eight years’ worth of Mr Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns. 

Mr Vance has been investigating allegations surrounding the payment of hush money before the 2016 presidential election to two women who said they had had sexual relationships with Mr Trump. 

The district attorney has said that the tax returns and financial records are pertinent to the case.

It is alleged that the payments were made by Mr Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen to adult film star Stormy Daniels and former Playboy model Karen McDougal.

Mr Trump denies the affairs took place and described the Supreme Court’s ruling last July as “purely political”.

Lawyers for Mr Vance later said the inquiry would extend beyond purported hush money payments. 

They citied newspaper articles about supposed bank and insurance fraud at the Trump Organization and congressional testimony by Cohen, who said the former president would devalue his assets when trying to reduce his taxes.

Mr Trump, who inherited money from his father and went on to become a property developer, is the first president since Richard Nixon in the 1970s not to have made his tax returns public.

Trump impeachment: lawyers deny he encouraged capitol riots

Lawyers for Donald Trump have responded to his impeachment charges, saying supporters of the former US president stormed Congress in Washington DC on 6 January of their own accord.

Mr Trump’s trial in the Senate is due to begin on Tuesday after he was impeached for the second time by the House of Representatives last month.

He is charged with “inciting insurrection” in a speech to supporters ahead of the deadly riot.

Mr Trump says he will not testify.

Five people, including a police officer, died when a mob of Trump supporters attacked the Capitol building, forcing politicians and staff to hide in offices.

Mr Trump is the only US president in history to have been impeached twice and one of only three to have been impeached at all.

In a pre-trial brief released on Monday, the former president’s lawyers said that FBI documents had shown that the riot was planned days in advance, meaning that Mr Trump cannot have encouraged the violence.

They also insist the trial is unconstitutional because Mr Trump has left office and is now a private citizen.

They hit out at the nine “impeachment managers” – Democrats from the House of Representatives who will lay out the case for prosecution – accusing them of “intellectual dishonesty and factual vacuity” in the way they portrayed Mr Trump’s address to his supporters.

“This impeachment proceeding was never about seeking justice,” the lawyers wrote.

“Instead, this was only ever a selfish attempt by Democratic leadership in the House to prey upon the feelings of horror and confusion that fell upon all Americans across the entire political spectrum upon seeing the destruction at the Capitol on January 6 by a few hundred people.” 

Democrats say Mr Trump’s repeated refusal to concede last November’s presidential election to Joe Biden – as well as the fiery rhetoric he used in his address to supporters on 6 January – encouraged the riot. 

His lawyers argue that Mr Trump was simply exercising his First Amendment rights to freedom of speech.

In their own response later on Monday, the House impeachment managers reasserted that Mr Trump had “betrayed the American people”.

“His incitement of insurrection against the United States government – which disrupted the peaceful transfer of power – is the most grievous constitutional crime ever committed by a president,” their statement said.

What will happen on Tuesday?

The trial is expected to begin with a four-hour debate and then a vote on whether the proceedings are unconstitutional.

If it proceeds – as it is expected to – opening debates will begin on Wednesday afternoon with both sides allowed up to 16 hours each for presentations. 

However, for the Senate to convict Mr Trump a two-thirds majority is required meaning 17 Republicans would need to join the chamber’s 50 Democrats in the vote. 

On 26 January, a bid to dismiss the case as unconstitutional was backed by 45 of the Senate’s 50 Republicans.

Trump supporters outside the Capitol
image captionThe storming of the US Capitol shocked the nation

What is the case for prosecution?

The former president is accused of “incitement of insurrection against the Republic he swore to protect” – namely the storming of the Capitol by his supporters as Congress met to confirm the result of the 3 November election. 

Mr Trump’s “statements turned his ‘wild’ rally on 6 January into a powder keg waiting to blow”, Democrats said in a pre-trial briefing.

They are expected to put before the Senate Mr Trump’s words – and footage from the riot – to show that “the furious crowd” was “primed (and prepared) for violence if he lit a spark”.

“The evidence is clear,” they wrote. “When other attempts to overturn the presidential election failed, former President Trump incited an attack on the Capitol.”

They argue that although he is no longer in office, “a president must answer comprehensively for his conduct in office from his first day in office through his last”.

They call for him to be disqualified from ever running for office again.

Trump awaits trial in the Senate

Donald Trump has been impeached – again. So what now?

Donald Trump waves as he walks to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on 12 January
image captionDonald Trump became the first US president to be impeached twice

The former president is the first in US history to have been charged with misconduct – or impeached – twice by the lower chamber of US Congress.

The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives accused Mr Trump of encouraging violence with his false claims of election fraud and egging on a mob to storm the Capitol on 6 January.

Some Republicans also backed impeachment in that historic vote.

What happens next?

Mr Trump, a Republican, now faces trial in the upper chamber, the Senate. 

A two-thirds majority in the Senate means a conviction. 

If Mr Trump is convicted, senators could also vote to bar him from ever holding public office again.

OK, when is the trial?

It is set to start next month.

Before that, the Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, needs to send the article of impeachment – the charge of incitement laid out and approved by the lower chamber – to the Senate.

She is set to do that on 25 January. According to the Constitution, that triggers the trial phase which must begin by 13:00 (local) the following day.

But the new Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer has agreed to a request from the Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, for more time during the pre-trial phase. So the trial itself will begin on 9 February.

Can he be tried now he has left?

It’s never happened before so it’s untested and the US Constitution doesn’t say.

Impeachment proceedings against President Richard Nixon were ended when he quit in 1974.

So Mr Trump could take his case to the Supreme Court, claiming his trial was unconstitutional.

Some lower ranked officials have been impeached after leaving office.

Would Mr Trump be convicted in the Senate?

Democrats only hold half the 100 seats so they would require 17 Republicans to vote against someone from their own party.

That’s a tall order from a party that has largely remained publicly loyal to Mr Trump.

But 10 Republicans in the House supported impeachment and a couple of senators have indicated they are open to it.

Even Mitch McConnell says he has not yet made up his mind how he will vote.

Could Trump run for president again if convicted?

If he is convicted by the Senate, lawmakers could hold another vote to block him from running for elected office again – which he had indicated he planned to do in 2024. 

This could be the biggest consequence of this impeachment.

If he is convicted, a simple majority of senators would be needed to block Mr Trump from holding “any office of honour, trust or profit under the United States”.

So 50 senators plus a casting vote from Vice-President Kamala Harris would be enough to damn Mr Trump’s hopes of political power.

This could be appealing to Republicans hoping to run for president in the future and those who want Mr Trump out of the party.

What about other benefits?

There has been talk of Mr Trump losing benefits granted to his predecessors under the 1958 Former Presidents Act, which include a pension and health insurance, and potentially a lifetime security detail at taxpayers’ expense. 

However, Mr Trump is likely to keep these benefits if he is convicted after leaving office.

What was his first impeachment for again?

That was over his dealings with Ukraine, although he denied any wrongdoing.

He was accused of pressing the country’s leader to open an investigation into Mr Biden, then his emerging rival for the White House, and his son Hunter.

Mr Trump appeared to use military aid as leverage. He was impeached by the House and cleared by the then Republican-controlled Senate.

Biden reverses controversial US travel bans

US President Joe Biden has begun to undo some of Donald Trump’s key policies, hours after being sworn in, including ending the travel ban on some majority-Muslim countries.

His proclamation said that the US “was built on a foundation of religious freedom and tolerance, a principle enshrined in the United States Constitution”.

“Nevertheless, the previous administration enacted a number of executive orders and presidential proclamations that prevented certain individuals from entering the United States – first from primarily Muslim countries, and later, from largely African countries. 

“Those actions are a stain on our national conscience and are inconsistent with our long history of welcoming people of all faiths and no faith at all.” 

Mr Trump signed a controversial travel ban just seven days after taking office as US president in January 2017, arguing it was vital to protect Americans. 

People from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, Venezuela, and North Korea were banned from obtaining any kind of visa. Chad was taken off this list in 2019. Last February, citizens of six more countries were barred from obtaining certain types of visas, including those from Eritrea, Nigeria, Sudan, and Tanzania. 

Mr Biden said the actions of Mr Trump’s administration had undermined national security. 

“They have jeopardised our global network of alliances and partnerships and are a moral blight that has dulled the power of our example the world over. And they have separated loved ones, inflicting pain that will ripple for years to come. They are just plain wrong.” 

But the new president said the US would still take threats to the country seriously. 

“When visa applicants request entry to the United States, we will apply a rigorous, individualised vetting system. But we will not turn our backs on our values with discriminatory bans on entry into the United States.”

Biden inauguration: New president sworn in amid Trump snub

Joe Biden has been sworn in as the 46th US president, ending one of the most dramatic political transitions in American history.

“Democracy has prevailed,” he said after taking the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts.

Outgoing President Donald Trump, who has not formally conceded to Mr Biden, is not attending the ceremony.

The new president has announced a raft of executive orders aimed at reversing Mr Trump’s key policies.

Vice-President-elect Harris was sworn in ahead of Mr Biden – becoming the first woman and the first black and Asian-American person elevated to serve in a role a heartbeat from the presidency.

The inauguration is taking place at the US Capitol. There is extra-tight security after the building was stormed by violent pro-Trump protesters in a deadly riot on 6 January.

Some 25,000 National Guards are protecting the inauguration ceremony, which is missing the traditional hundreds of thousands of spectators because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Mr Trump left the White House for the last time as president shortly after 08:00 (13:00 GMT). He boarded a helicopter, flew to the nearby Andrews Air Force base, and has now arrived in Florida.

He is the first president not to attend his successor’s inauguration since 1869.

How is inauguration day unfolding?

Early on Wednesday Mr Biden attended Mass at a cathedral in Washington – along with four Roman Catholic congressional leaders, both Democrats and Republicans – before making his way to the Capitol. 

Age 78, Mr Biden is the oldest US president ever to be sworn in. In his inaugural address, he said it was a day of “history and hope”.

Among those attending the ceremony are three of his predecessors: Barack Obama – under whom Mr Biden served for eight years as vice-president – Bill Clinton and George W Bush.

Outgoing Vice-President Mike Pence is also attending the ceremony. He skipped Mr Trump’s farewell military salute event at Andrews base.

Aides say Mr Biden will use his inaugural address of about half an hour to deliver an optimistic call for national unity after his Republican predecessor’s turbulent tenure.

President-elect Joe Biden and Jill Biden attend services at the Cathedral of St Matthew in Washington, DC
image captionJoe Biden and his wife Jill attended a church service ahead of the inauguration

The ceremony includes musical performances by Lady Gaga – who sang the national anthem – as well as Jennifer Lopez and Garth Brooks.

An evening concert at the Lincoln Memorial in the city will be hosted by Tom Hanks and include Bruce Springsteen, John Legend, Jon Bon Jovi, Justin Timberlake, and Demi Lovato.

What is Trump doing?

In his address at Andrews Air Force base the outgoing president highlighted what he regarded as the successes of his presidency. “What we’ve done has been amazing by any standard,” Mr Trump said.

The 74-year-old flew off to begin post-presidential life at his Mar-a-Lago golf club in Palm Beach.

In his last hours, Mr Trump granted clemency to more than 140 people, including his former adviser Steve Bannon, who had been facing fraud charges.

The political drama surrounding Mr Trump is far from over. The US Senate is expected to put him on trial soon, following his record second impeachment by the House of Representatives for allegedly inciting the Capitol riot.

On Tuesday, the Senate’s Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, said the mob had been provoked by Mr Trump and fed lies.

What will Biden do on his first day?

Mr Biden has set out a flurry of executive orders. In a statement on Wednesday he said he would sign 15 orders after he is sworn in. They will:

  • Reverse Mr Trump’s withdrawal of the US from the Paris climate accord
  • Revoke the presidential permit granted to the Keystone XL Pipeline, which is opposed by environmentalists and Native American groups
  • Revoke Trump policies on immigration enforcement and the emergency declaration that helped fund the construction of a Mexican border wall
  • Bring about a mask and distancing mandate for federal employees and in federal buildings, and a new White House office on coronavirus
  • End a travel ban on visitors from some, mainly Muslim, nations

Other orders will cover race and gender equality, along with climate issues.

Mr Biden’s vice-president will swear in three new Democratic senators on Wednesday, leaving the upper chamber of Congress evenly split between the two main parties. This will allow the vice-president to act as a tie-breaker in key votes. 

Mr Biden’s legislative ambitions could be tempered by the slender majorities he holds in both the Senate and House of Representatives. 

On Tuesday, Mr Biden delivered a speech in his home state of Delaware, telling reporters “these are dark times… but there’s always light”, before heading to Washington.

In the evening, he and Ms Harris led a tribute at the reflecting pool in front of the Lincoln Memorial to the 400,000 Americans lost to Covid-19.

They were almost alone on the National Mall, where some 200,000 flags have been planted to represent the crowds who will be absent at Wednesday’s inauguration.

What’s the mood like in Washington? 

Some 25,000 National Guard troops are guarding the Capitol, White House and National Mall, which are also protected by a ring of steel made up of barricades and tall fencing.

Ahead of Mr Biden’s arrival in the city, 12 National Guard members were removed from the presidential inauguration security mission after they were found to have ties with right-wing militia groups or posted extremist views online. 

There was no threat to Mr Biden, officials said.

Ex-Google engineer among those pardoned by Donald Trump

A former Google engineer sentenced to 18 months in prison is among those pardoned by US President Donald Trump as he leaves office.

Anthony Levandowski stole information about self-driving cars before setting up autonomous lorry company Otto.

The pardon was supported by Silicon Valley figures including investor Peter Thiel and Oculus founder Palmer Luckey.

At the time of sentencing, in August, the judge said it was “the biggest trade-secret crime I have ever seen”.

But Judge Alsup also called Levandowski “a brilliant, ground-breaking engineer that our country needs”.

‘Significant price’

That was quoted in the outgoing Trump administration’s memo justifying the pardon.

Levandowski had “paid a significant price for his actions and plans to devote his talents to advance the public good”, it added.

In the final hours of his presidency, Mr Trump pardoned 73 people, including his former adviser Steve Bannon.

Levandowski had not started his sentence because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

As an employee, he downloaded more than 14,000 files containing the intellectual property of Google’s former self-driving car division, Waymo, before leaving to found Otto, which was soon acquired by Uber.

Levandowski went on to run Uber’s self-driving project, only to be fired in 2017 over the case.

He denied the charges against him.

In February 2017, Google’s parent company, Alphabet, sued Uber over the theft in a case eventually settled in 2018.

Biden inauguration: Democrat to be sworn in as Trump leaves office

Joe Biden is to be sworn in as US president, taking the helm of a nation wracked by political division, economic anguish and an unrelenting pandemic.

Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris will take the oath of office alongside him in Washington DC, which has been fortified amid fears of civil unrest.

Some 25,000 troops will guard the inauguration ceremony after a deadly riot at the Capitol earlier this month.

Donald Trump will leave the White House for the last time, bound for Florida.

He will not be attending the inauguration ceremony.

How will inauguration day unfold?

Mr Biden will be sworn in as 46th president of the United States by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts shortly before midday (17:00 GMT) on Wednesday outside the US Capitol.

Due to Covid restrictions, the ceremony will be bereft of the cheering throngs of well-wishers traditional at inaugurations. It will also see extra-tight security after the US Capitol was breached by violent pro-Trump protesters on 6 January.

Among those present will be three former presidents: Barack Obama – whom Mr Biden served for eight years as vice-president – Bill Clinton and George W Bush.

Outgoing Vice-President Mike Pence will also attend the ceremony, skipping Mr Trump’s farewell event at a military base outside the nation’s capital.

Aides say Mr Biden, a Democrat, will use his inaugural address of about half an hour to deliver an optimistic call for national unity after his Republican predecessor’s turbulent tenure.

President-elect Joe Biden and Jill Biden at the Chase Center, November 7, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware
image captionJoe Biden, pictured with his wife Jill, served as vice-president under Barack Obama

Minutes beforehand, Vice-President-elect Harris will be sworn in, becoming the first black and Asian-American elevated to serve in a role a heartbeat from the presidency.

There will be musical performances from Lady Gaga – who will sing the national anthem – Jennifer Lopez and Garth Brooks.

An evening concert at the Lincoln Memorial in the city will be hosted by Tom Hanks and include Bruce Springsteen, John Legend, Jon Bon Jovi, Justin Timberlake, and Demi Lovato.

Mr Biden, a Catholic, plans to attend Mass on Wednesday morning at a cathedral in the city with the four top congressional leaders – Republicans and Democrats.

What is Trump doing?

Mr Trump will become the first president not to attend his successor’s inauguration since Andrew Johnson snubbed Ulysses S Grant in 1869.

He will host a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on Wednesday morning before catching a final flight on Air Force One to begin post-presidential life at his Mar-a-Lago golf club in Palm Beach.

In his last hours, Mr Trump granted clemency to more than 140 people, including his former adviser Steve Bannon, who is facing fraud charges.

A pardon was announced for rapper Lil Wayne and commutations for rapper Kodak Black and former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick.

In a farewell video message on Tuesday, Mr Trump called on Americans to pray for the incoming administration, though he did not mention his successor by name.

He said he was proud of what he had achieved over the past four years, highlighting his Middle East peace deals and his record as the first president in decades not to start any wars.https://emp.bbc.com/emp/SMPj/2.36.7/iframe.htmlmedia caption‘Fake News’, lots of protests, a pandemic and a double impeachment

But the political drama surrounding him is far from over. The US Senate is expected to put him on trial soon, following his record second impeachment by the House of Representatives for allegedly inciting the Capitol riot.

On Tuesday, the Senate’s Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, said the mob had been provoked by Mr Trump and fed lies.

What did Biden do on the eve of inauguration?

Mr Biden had planned to take an Amtrak train into Washington, as he did so often during his years as a veteran senator.

But amid all the heightened security, he instead opted to fly in a private plane to Joint Base Andrews.

On Tuesday evening, he and Ms Harris led a tribute at the reflecting pool in front of the Lincoln Memorial to the 400,000 Americans lost to Covid-19.

They were almost alone on the National Mall, where some 200,000 flags have been planted to represent the crowds who will be absent at Wednesday’s inauguration.https://emp.bbc.com/emp/SMPj/2.36.7/iframe.htmlmedia caption”When I die, Delaware will be written on my heart”

Earlier on Tuesday, Mr Biden wept as he prepared to embark from his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware.

“These are dark times,” he told dozens of supporters. “But there’s always light.”

Mr Biden stayed on Tuesday night with his wife Jill in Blair House, a residence for heads of state and other important visitors across the road from the White House.

What will Biden do on his first day?

Mr Biden plans to issue a flurry of executive orders.

Among other measures, he is expected to reverse Mr Trump’s withdrawal of the US from the Paris climate accord, cancel his predecessor’s travel ban on visitors from several mainly Muslim countries, and unveil a bill to provide an eight-year path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the US.

His vice-president will swear in three new Democratic senators on Wednesday, leaving the upper chamber of Congress evenly split between the two main parties, and allowing Ms Harris to cast the deciding vote on any deadlocked legislation.

Mr Biden’s legislative ambitions could be tempered by the slender majorities he holds in both the Senate and House of Representatives. 

Five of his Cabinet picks – Antony Blinken (state department), Janet Yellen (Treasury), Lloyd Austin (Pentagon), Alejandro Mayorkas (Homeland Security) and Avril Haines (Director of National Intelligence) – are undergoing confirmation hearings before Senate committees. 

What’s the mood like in Washington?

Some 25,000 National Guard troops are guarding the Capitol, White House and National Mall, which are also protected by a ring of steel made up of barricades and tall fencing.

Largely emptied of ordinary Americans, central Washington DC has been carved up into “green” and “red” zones reminiscent of war-torn Baghdad.

Ahead of Mr Biden’s arrival in the city, 12 National Guard members were removed from the presidential inauguration security mission after they were found to have ties with right-wing militia groups or posted extremist views online. 

There was no threat to Mr Biden, officials said.

Donald Trump’s farewell: We did what we came to do

US President Donald Trump has made his farewell address before leaving office, saying: “We did what we came to do – and so much more.”

In a video posted on YouTube, he said he took on “the tough battles, the hardest fights… because that’s what you elected me to do”.

Mr Trump has still not fully accepted the result of last November’s election, which he lost to Democrat Joe Biden.

Mr Biden will be sworn in as president on Wednesday. 

The last two weeks of Mr Trump’s term have been dominated by the fallout from the deadly riot on Capitol Hill, when a mob of his supporters stormed Congress, seeking to overturn the election result. 

“Political violence is an attack on everything we cherish as Americans. It can never be tolerated,” Mr Trump said in his video, in which he did not acknowledge his successor by name.

What else did Trump say?

Mr Trump himself has been impeached for “incitement of insurrection” over the attack and will face trial in the Senate after he leaves office. If convicted, he could be barred from standing for public office.

He is the first president in US history to be impeached twice. At his first trial, he was cleared on charges relating to dealings with Ukraine by the majority from his own Republican Party. 

The politically motivated violence has overshadowed the growing toll from the coronavirus pandemic, in which more than 400,000 Americans have died and 24 million have been infected.

In his message, Mr Trump said his administration built “the greatest economy in the history of the world”. 

US stock markets have rebounded from the coronavirus pandemic, with the tech-heavy Nasdaq index up 42% in 2020, and the wider S&P 500 up 15%.

However, the rest of the economy is facing more of a struggle. Employers cut jobs in December, ending a string of job gains. Retail sales have dropped in recent months, while jobless claims rise.

He leaves office with an approval rating of 34%, a record low for a departing president.

“Our agenda was not about right or left, it wasn’t about Republican or Democrat, but about the good of a nation, and that means the whole nation,” he said. 

How is Biden preparing for office?

Mr Biden and his wife Jill Biden left their home state of Delaware on Tuesday to return to Washington, where the incoming president served as a senator for 36 years before becoming vice-president to Barack Obama from 2008 to 2016. 

“When I die, Delaware will be written on my heart,” he said in an emotional farewell speech. https://emp.bbc.com/emp/SMPj/2.36.7/iframe.htmlmedia caption”When I die, Delaware will be written on my heart”

On Wednesday, he will go to the White House and then the Capitol for his inauguration at 12:00 (17:00 GMT). 

This will be an inauguration like no other: Washington is under heavy security after the Capitol riots, with thousands of reserve soldiers from the National Guard deployed and metal fences around the White House. 

Only a limited number of people will be allowed on to the National Mall to witness his swearing in, in contrast to the hundreds of thousands who usually attend. 

Among those staying away will be Mr Trump. He flies to Florida on Wednesday morning – the first president to skip his successor’s inauguration since Andrew Johnson in 1869.

Melania’s jacket and nine other defining images of Trump’s presidency

After four years of President Donald Trump, the US is gearing up for a new leader on 20 January. 

We’ve put together a selection of some of the key moments from his presidency, from meetings with world leaders to celebrity guests at the White House.

Crowds at the 2017 inauguration

Crowds are seen gathered at Mr Trump’s inauguration ceremony on 20 January 2017.

Days after the ceremony, the president accused the media of lying about attendance, claiming that TV footage and photos of the inauguration had made the crowds look smaller than they were.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told the media it had been “the largest audience to ever see an inauguration, period”.

The new president was reported to have been angry at unfavourable comparisons with photos from Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009 which showed a significantly larger crowd size.

White Supremacists take part in a Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on 11 August 2017

A torch-lit rally by the far-right and white nationalists through Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 drew comparisons with the Ku Klux Klan.

The following day a woman was killed and 19 were injured when a car ploughed into a crowd of counter-protesters in the university city.

In response, President Trump condemned violence by “many sides”, prompting a wave of criticism for appearing to make an equivalence between white supremacists and anti-racism protesters. 

It then took 48 hours for him to explicitly denounce far-right extremists. He eventually called “KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists repugnant to everything we hold dear” but the damage was done.

Three years later, Joe Biden said it was this hesitation that prompted his decision to run against him.

Trump surrounded by other world leaders at the G8 summit in Canada in 2018

Mr Trump frequently sparred with the US’s traditional allies and this was certainly in evidence at the G7 summit in Canada in June 2018. 

The meeting did not get off to a good start when prior to the summit he announced a 25% tariff on imports of steel and 10% on aluminium from the EU, Mexico and Canada. They all threatened retaliatory measures and the rift overshadowed the summit. French President Emmanuel Macron engaged in a Twitter spat with the president just hours before the summit. 

Other photos from the meeting showed more friendly relations between the leaders but the one pictured here was considered by many to reflect the underlying tensions of the gathering.

Mr Trump left before other leaders and claimed that America was “like the piggy bank that everybody is robbing”. 

Melania Trump wears a jacket which reads 'I really don't care, do u?'

First Lady Melania Trump is pictured wearing a jacket in June 2018 which reads “I really don’t care, do you?” during a trip to a migrant child detention centre. 

There was widespread speculation and criticism over what message Mrs Trump intended to send by wearing the jacket on that particular trip, particularly at a time when the president was coming under fire for his policy of separating children from their parents at the border. 

Mrs Trump’s spokeswoman said at the time “there was no hidden message” behind the coat.

However, the First Lady later admitted it had been a message “for the people and for the left-wing media who are criticising me. I want to show them I don’t care. You could criticise whatever you want to say. But it will not stop me to do what I feel is right”.

Nancy Pelosi claps President Trump during his State of the Union address

Nancy Pelosi gives what many saw as a sarcastic clap at the end of Mr Trump’s State of the Union address in February 2019. Mr Trump called for compromise in politics during his speech. 

He broke traditional protocol by not waiting for the customary introduction from the House speaker before beginning his speech. 

Many on social media thought the political rivalry between the House speaker and the president was captured in this image. The photo, termed the “Pelosi clap”, quickly went viral. 

Mr Trump steps into the northern side of the military demarcation line dividing the two Koreas

Mr Trump walks into the northern side of the military demarcation line that divides North and South Korea in June 2019. In doing so, he became the first US sitting president to cross the line.

Mr Trump’s decision to meet Kim Jong-un without pre-conditions was unprecedented and stunned the world, particularly as it came after the pair had exchanged insults and threats.

Despite the apparent warming of relations, little concrete progress was made on negotiations over North Korea’s nuclear programme and a second summit in Hanoi in 2019 broke down after the US refused Pyongyang’s demands for sanctions relief.

Kim Kardashian speaks alongside President Trump during a criminal justice reform event

Kim Kardashian-West speaks at a White House event about prison reform in June 2019. The reality TV star has had the ear of the president while campaigning for changes to the US justice system.

In 2018, she lobbied the Trump administration on behalf of a grandmother jailed for life. Alice Johnson was later granted clemency in a high-profile decision by Mr Trump. 

President Trump has already given pardons to 94 people and there is speculation he may pardon 100 others before he leaves office.

President Trump holds a bible in front of St John's Episcopal church in Washington DC

Mr Trump holds a bible in front of St John’s Episcopal Church, just across the road from the White House in June 2020.

Peaceful demonstrators had been cleared in nearby Lafayette Square with pepper spray and flash-bang grenades so that the president and his entourage could walk to the church.

He had earlier said he planned to “dominate the streets” to end weeks of civil unrest over the killing of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, by a white police officer in Minneapolis. 

His actions prompted shock and anger from many religious leaders, who accused him of using religion for political purposes.

(From top) Eric Trump, son of the US President, daughter and Senior Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump, US First Lady Melania Trump, daughter of the US President Tiffany Trump and Donald Trump Jr., son of the US President, are seen ahead of the first presidential debate at the Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio on September 29, 2020

The Trump family watch as Donald Trump debates Joe Biden at their first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio, on 29 September 2020. 

They broke debate rules that all spectators wear masks – sparking the same criticism often aimed at their father for taking a cavalier attitude to the virus.

A few days after the debate, the president tested positive himself.

He spent three nights in a hospital receiving treatment before returning to the White House and declaring he felt “really good” and urging others not to be afraid of the virus.

Supporters of Donald Trump at the west entrance of the Capitol during the 'Stop the Steal' protest

Crowds of Trump supporters climb on the US Capitol in DC earlier this month following a “Stop the Steal” rally. 

It followed a 70-minute address by the president in which he exhorted them to march on Congress where politicians were meeting to certify Democrat Joe Biden’s win. The mob ransacked the Capitol building and attempted to enter the chambers where lawmakers were hiding. 

Five people, including a police officer, were killed. 

Mr Trump has since been impeached, becoming the first president ever to be impeached twice. But he denies charges that he inciting the mob to attack the Capitol.